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Alfredo Zitarrosa

Alfredo Zitarrosa Alfredo Zitarrosa[9†]

Alfredo Zitarrosa (March 10, 1936 – January 17, 1989) was a prominent Uruguayan singer-songwriter, poet, and journalist[1†][2†][3†][4†]. He was born in Montevideo, Uruguay[1†][2†]. Zitarrosa specialized in Uruguayan and Argentinean folk genres such as zamba and milonga[1†][3†][4†]. He became a chief figure in the nueva canción movement in his country[1†][3†][4†]. A staunch supporter of Communist ideals, he lived in exile between 1976 and 1984[1†][3†][4†]. He is widely regarded as one of the most influential singer-songwriters of Latin America[1†].

Early Years and Education

Alfredo Zitarrosa was born on March 10, 1936, in the Belvedere neighborhood of Montevideo, Uruguay[1†]. He was the illegitimate son of 19-year-old Jesusa Blanca Nieve Iribarne (Blanca)[1†]. Shortly after being born, Blanca handed over her son to be raised by Carlos Durán, a man of many trades, and his wife, Doraisella Carbajal[1†]. They lived in several cities and neighborhoods, and between 1944 and the end of 1947, they moved to the town of Santiago Vázquez[1†]. They frequently visited the countryside near Trinidad, capital city of the Flores Department, where Alfredo’s adoptive mother was born[1†]. This childhood experience stayed with him forever, notably in his repertoire, the majority of which contains rhythms and songs of peasant origin, mainly milongas[1†].

In his early adolescence, Alfredo moved to live with his biological mother and her husband, the Argentine Alfredo Nicolás Zitarrosa, who would eventually give him his surname[1†]. Together with his newborn sister, they lived in the area now known as Rincón de la Bolsa, at km. 29.50 of the old route to Colonia, San José Department[1†]. Based there, he commuted to study at the High School in Montevideo, where he eventually moved into his early youth[1†]. First, he lived with the Duráns and then in Mrs. Ema’s pension, located at Colonia and Medanos (today Barrios Amorín) streets[1†].

Career Development and Achievements

Alfredo Zitarrosa began his artistic career in 1954, as a radio broadcaster[1†]. He entered as a presenter and entertainer, librettist, and informativist, or even as an actor[1†]. His first composition, called “Recordandote,” was made in 1960, a zamba later popularized by los Chalchaleros[1†][5†]. After returning to his native country, Alfredo Zitarrosa started working as an announcer and journalist without leaving his music career[1†][5†].

On July 20, 1970, the singer/songwriter made a successful live debut in Buenos Aires[1†][5†]. His songs were played throughout Latin America[1†][5†]. In February of 1976, the artist went into exile, temporarily living in Argentina, Spain, and Mexico[1†][5†]. He returned to Uruguay in March of 1984[1†][5†].

Zitarrosa specialized in Uruguayan and Argentinean folk genres such as zamba and milonga[1†][6†][7†]. He became a chief figure in the nueva canción movement in his country[1†][6†][7†]. A staunch supporter of Communist ideals, he lived in exile between 1976 and 1984[1†][6†][7†]. He is widely regarded as one of the most influential singer-songwriters of Latin America[1†][6†][7†].

First Publication of His Main Works

Alfredo Zitarrosa’s career began in the 1950s, and he released his first album in 1962[1†]. Throughout his career, he released over 30 albums, and his songs were covered by many other artists[1†]. He was also a prolific composer, writing over 500 songs[1†].

One of his notable works is the song “Guitarrero Viejo” from the album "Antología III 1936-1989"[1†][8†]. The song is a poignant reflection on the life of an old guitarist, capturing the essence of the musician’s struggle and passion[1†][8†].

Here are some of his main works:

Zitarrosa’s works are deeply rooted in the folk genres of Uruguay and Argentina, such as zamba and milonga[1†]. His songs often reflect his deep understanding of rural life and the struggles of the common people[1†].

Analysis and Evaluation

Alfredo Zitarrosa was a significant figure in the nueva canción movement in Uruguay[1†][7†][6†]. He specialized in Uruguayan and Argentinean folk genres such as zamba and milonga[1†][7†][6†]. His songs often reflect his deep understanding of rural life and the struggles of the common people[1†].

Zitarrosa’s music is deeply rooted in the folk traditions of Uruguay and Argentina. His songs are characterized by their poignant lyrics and the use of traditional musical forms such as zamba and milonga[1†][7†][6†]. His music often reflects his political beliefs, and he was a staunch supporter of Communist ideals[1†][7†][6†].

Zitarrosa’s influence extends beyond his music. He is widely regarded as one of the most influential singer-songwriters of Latin America[1†][7†][6†]. His songs have been covered by many other artists, and his music continues to be celebrated today[1†][7†].

Zitarrosa lived in exile between 1976 and 1984 due to his support for Communist ideals[1†][7†][6†]. Despite this, he continued to produce music and remained a prominent figure in the nueva canción movement[1†][7†][6†].

In conclusion, Alfredo Zitarrosa’s work has had a profound impact on Latin American music. His songs, characterized by their poignant lyrics and traditional musical forms, reflect his deep understanding of rural life and his political beliefs[1†][7†][6†]. Despite living in exile, Zitarrosa remained a significant figure in the nueva canción movement and is widely regarded as one of the most influential singer-songwriters of Latin America[1†][7†][6†].

Personal Life

Alfredo Zitarrosa was born as the illegitimate son of 19-year-old Jesusa Blanca Nieve Iribarne (Blanca) in Montevideo, Uruguay[1†]. Shortly after being born, Blanca handed over her son to be raised by Carlos Durán, a man of many trades, and his wife, Doraisella Carbajal[1†]. They lived in several cities and neighborhoods, and between 1944 and the end of 1947, they moved to the town of Santiago Vázquez[1†]. They frequently visited the countryside near Trinidad, capital city of the Flores Department, where Alfredo’s adoptive mother was born[1†].

In his early adolescence, Alfredo moved to live with his biological mother and her husband, the Argentine Alfredo Nicolás Zitarrosa, who would eventually give him his surname[1†]. Together with his newborn sister, they lived in the area now known as Rincón de la Bolsa, at km. 29.50 of the old route to Colonia, San José Department[1†]. Based there, he commuted to study at the High School in Montevideo, where he eventually moved into his early youth[1†].

First, he lived with the Duráns and then in Mrs. Ema’s pension, located at Colonia and Medanos (today Barrios Amorín) streets, to fill after the famous attic of the house which was used as a pension and was owned by Blanca Iribarne, his mother, located on Yaguarón street (today Aquiles Lanza) 1021, in front of the plaza currently bearing his name nearby the Central Cemetery[1†]. He worked, among other duties, as a seller of furniture, subscriptions to a medical society, clerical and in a print shop[1†].

Conclusion and Legacy

Alfredo Zitarrosa’s legacy is profound and enduring. He is widely regarded as one of the most influential singer-songwriters of Latin America[1†][7†][6†]. His music, deeply rooted in the folk traditions of Uruguay and Argentina, played a significant role in the nueva canción movement, which used music as a form of social protest[1†][7†][6†].

Zitarrosa’s commitment to social justice and his staunch support of Communist ideals led to his exile between 1976 and 1984[1†][7†][6†]. Despite these challenges, he continued to produce music that resonated with people across Latin America. His songs, often dealing with themes of love, social inequality, and political resistance, continue to be celebrated for their lyrical beauty and emotional depth[1†][7†][6†].

Since 2007, the English Wikipedia page of Alfredo Zitarrosa has received more than 72,710 page views[1†][7†]. His biography is available in 20 different languages on Wikipedia[1†][7†]. Among writers, Alfredo Zitarrosa ranks 4,465 out of 5,755[1†][7†]. Among people born in 1936, Alfredo Zitarrosa ranks 340[1†][7†]. Among people deceased in 1989, Alfredo Zitarrosa ranks 192[1†][7†]. Among people born in Uruguay, Alfredo Zitarrosa ranks 117 out of 370[1†][7†]. Among writers born in Uruguay, Alfredo Zitarrosa ranks 13[1†][7†].

Zitarrosa’s music continues to inspire new generations of artists and activists, and his contributions to Latin American culture and society are remembered and celebrated today[1†][7†][6†].

Key Information

References and Citations:

  1. Wikipedia (English) - Alfredo Zitarrosa [website] - link
  2. CelebsAgeWiki - Alfredo Zitarrosa Biography, Age, Height, Wife, Net Worth, Family [website] - link
  3. Kiddle Encyclopedia - Alfredo Zitarrosa Facts for Kids [website] - link
  4. DBpedia - About: Alfredo Zitarrosa [website] - link
  5. AllMusic - Alfredo Zitarrosa [website] - link
  6. Wikiwand - Alfredo Zitarrosa - Wikiwand [website] - link
  7. Pantheon - Alfredo Zitarrosa Biography - Musical artist [website] - link
  8. Youtube - Alfredo Zitarrosa - Guitarrero Viejo (Official Audio) - YouTube [website] - link
  9. Argentina.gob.ar - Alfredo Zitarrosa: música para un mundo mejor [website] - link
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