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Dalmiro Sáenz

Dalmiro Sáenz Dalmiro Sáenz[1†]

Dalmiro Antonio Sáenz (June 13, 1926 – September 11, 2016) was an Argentine writer and playwright[1†][2†]. Born in Buenos Aires, he began his literary activity early on, publishing by his 30s[1†]. After traveling through Patagonia for several seasons, he settled there for almost 15 years, where he developed his first storybook: “Seventy Times Seven,” which won the prestigious award of Editorial Emecé, and became a bestseller[1†]. His works often presented a vision that was violent, erotic, and posed solid precepts and moral questions about religion[1†]. This unique approach would become the hallmark of Sáenz for several years[1†].

Early Years and Education

Dalmiro Antonio Sáenz was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in 1926[1†][3†]. He began his literary activity early on, and published his first book at the age of thirty[1†][3†]. This early start in his career was influenced by his experiences traveling by ship through Patagonia for several seasons[1†]. He settled in Patagonia for almost fifteen years, where his first storybooks took place[1†]. It was during this time that he developed his first storybook: “Seventy Times Seven,” which won the prestigious award from Editorial Emecé and became a bestseller[1†]. His works were supported by a vision that was violent, erotic, and posed solid precepts and moral questions about religion[1†]. This unique approach would become the hallmark of Sáenz for several years[1†].

Career Development and Achievements

Dalmiro Sáenz’s career was marked by a series of significant achievements and contributions to literature[1†][4†]. After publishing his first book in his 30s, he continued to develop his literary activity, which was influenced by his experiences traveling through Patagonia[1†][4†].

His first storybook, “Seventy Times Seven,” won the prestigious award from Editorial Emecé and became a bestseller[1†][4†]. This work was based on a vision that was violent, erotic, and posed solid precepts and moral questions about religion[1†][4†].

Sáenz participated in the screenplay adaptation for the big screen of the two stories in “Seventy Times Seven”, which were joined to assemble the frame for the homonymous film directed by Leopoldo Torre Nilsson in 1962[1†]. After this onset, Sáenz won the Award of Life magazine in Spanish, in 1963, with his storybook "No"[1†]. The same year, he won the award Argentores by the Sociedad Argentina de Autores with “Thirty Thirty”, a tale raised in the manner of an American western, but located in Patagonia[1†].

In 1964, he published “The Necessary Sin,” a novel that was later adapted to create the script for the film version, called “Nobody heard Cecilio Fuentes scream” directed by Fernando Siro, and winner of the Silver Shell (Concha de Plata) in the International Film Festival of San Sebastian, Spain (1965)[1†].

He began to write plays and very soon he was awarded the prize “Casa de las Américas”, in Cuba in 1966, with “Hip Hip Ufa,” which was adapted to create the script for the film version with the title “Ufa con el sexo” (1968) under the direction of Rodolfo Kuhn[1†].

According to his statements, Sáenz took literary vacations between books by writing small books of humor, which were very successful[1†]. Among them stands out “I Also Was A Spermatozoid” published by the editorial Torres Agüero[1†].

Then began an intimate and detailed description of the feminine universe, with a vision that is surprising and original, and promptly became a bestseller titled “Open Letter To My Future Ex-wife” published by editorial Emecé in 1968, and re-edited several times, until the last version in 1999[1†].

First Publication of His Main Works

Dalmiro Sáenz’s literary journey began in his 30s, after spending several seasons traveling by ship through Patagonia[1†]. His first significant work was a storybook titled “Seventy Times Seven” (“Setenta veces siete”), which won the prestigious award of Editorial Emecé and became a bestseller[1†][5†]. This work was characterized by a vision that was violent, erotic, and filled with solid precepts and moral questions about religion[1†].

Here are some of his main works:

Each of these works reflects Sáenz’s unique perspective and his ability to capture the essence of the feminine sensibility[1†]. His works have had a significant impact on Argentine literature[1†][5†].

Analysis and Evaluation

Dalmiro Sáenz’s work is characterized by a unique vision that is violent, erotic, and filled with solid precepts and moral questions about religion[1†]. This hallmark of Sáenz’s work has been consistent throughout his career[1†]. Critics agree that a religious axis always passes through the stories of this author[1†]. This is evident in works like “Christ Standing” (“Cristo de pie”), where religiosity is in controversy with the established religion, as opposed to the individual dialogue that the character has with God[1†].

Sáenz’s ability to capture the essence of the feminine sensibility is another notable aspect of his work[1†]. This is particularly evident in his book “Open Letter To My Future Ex-wife” (“Carta abierta a mi futura ex-mujer”), which provides an intimate and detailed description of the feminine universe[1†]. This book promptly became a bestseller and is noted for its surprising and original vision[1†].

His play “Who me?” (“¿Quién yo?”) has been played almost without interruption since its publication and has become a classic of the absurd in the Argentine theater scene[1†]. This demonstrates Sáenz’s significant influence in Argentine literature and theater[1†].

In conclusion, Dalmiro Sáenz’s work is characterized by its unique vision, its exploration of religious themes, and its insightful portrayal of the feminine sensibility[1†]. His significant contributions to literature and theater have left a lasting impact on Argentine culture[1†].

Personal Life

Dalmiro Sáenz lived in Buenos Aires, Argentina, where he worked as a writer, coordinated his literary workshop, and also made cultural commentaries on the radio, in addition to writing articles as a freelance for the most prestigious newspapers and magazines[1†]. He was born in Buenos Aires in 1926 and passed away in the same city in 2016[1†][2†]. He was buried in the Cementerio de la Chacarita[1†][2†].

Unfortunately, there is limited information available about his personal life, relationships, and family. Sáenz was a private individual, and much of his life outside of his professional career remains unknown.

Conclusion and Legacy

Dalmiro Sáenz left an indelible mark on Argentine literature. His works, characterized by a relentless sarcasm accompanied by a hilarity that reaches absurdity, have been among the most represented in Argentina[1†]. He was a prolific writer and author of numerous bestsellers[1†].

Sáenz’s literary activity began early on, and he started publishing in his 30s[1†][2†]. After traveling through Patagonia for several seasons, he settled there for almost 15 years, where he developed his first storybook: "Seventy Times Seven,"[1†][2†]. This book won the prestigious award of Editorial Emecé and became a bestseller[1†][2†]. His vision, which was violent, sexual, and filled with solid precepts and moral questions about religion, became his hallmark for several years[1†][2†].

Sáenz’s works have been adapted for the big screen and have won prestigious awards[1†]. He also wrote plays and small books of humor[1†][2†]. His play “Hip… Hip… Ufa!” won the “Casa de las Américas” award in Cuba in 1966[1†][2†].

Dalmiro Sáenz passed away on September 11, 2016, at the age of 90[1†][2†][6†]. His legacy continues to influence Argentine literature and his works continue to be celebrated for their unique style and profound themes[1†].

Key Information

References and Citations:

  1. Wikipedia (English) - Dalmiro Sáenz [website] - link
  2. Wikipedia (Spanish) - Dalmiro Sáenz [website] - link
  3. Argentores (Autores Argentinos) - Dalmiro Saenz [website] - link
  4. IMDb - Dalmiro Sáenz [website] - link
  5. Goodreads - Author: Books by Dalmiro Sáenz (Author of ¿Quién yo?) [website] - link
  6. History's Greatest - Dalmiro Sáenz, Argentine playwright, Died at 90 [website] - link
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