Ondertexts
Emilio Bobadilla
Search

Emilio Bobadilla

Emilio Bobadilla Emilio Bobadilla[1†]

Emilio Bobadilla (24 June 1862, Cárdenas, Cuba - 1 January 1921, Biarritz, France) was a Cuban writer, poet, literary critic, and journalist[1†][2†]. He was also known by the pseudonym "Fray Candil"[1†][2†].

Bobadilla’s work spanned a variety of genres, including poetry, literary criticism, storytelling, and travel writing[1†]. His writings were characterized by a strong and vigorous style, and he was known for his aggressive, biting, and carefree temperament[1†][2†].

Early Years and Education

Emilio Bobadilla was born on June 24, 1862, in Cárdenas, Cuba[1†]. There is limited information available about his early years and family background. However, it is known that his journey as a writer began in Havana, where he started contributing to “El Amigo del País” and later directed the satirical weeklies “El Epigrama” (1883) and “El Carnaval” (1886), making his pseudonym Fray Candil famous[1†].

In 1887, Bobadilla moved to Madrid, where he graduated with a doctorate in Civil and Canon Law from the Central University in 1889[1†]. His time in Madrid was significant for his career development as his works appeared in various publications[1†].

Bobadilla’s early education and experiences played a crucial role in shaping his career as a writer, poet, literary critic, and journalist. His writings were characterized by a strong and vigorous style, and he was known for his aggressive, biting, and carefree temperament[1†].

Career Development and Achievements

Emilio Bobadilla’s career as a writer began in Havana, where he started contributing to “El Amigo del País” and later directed the satirical weeklies “El Epigrama” (1883) and “El Carnaval” (1886), making his pseudonym Fray Candil famous[3†]. His writings were characterized by a strong and vigorous style, and he was known for his aggressive, biting, and carefree temperament[3†].

In 1887, Bobadilla moved to Madrid, where he graduated with a doctorate in Civil and Canon Law from the Central University in 1889[3†]. During his time in Madrid, his works appeared in various publications[3†]. He also lived in Paris for a significant period, contributing to several French publications[3†].

Bobadilla returned to Cuba in 1909 for two years and was later appointed consul of Cuba in Bayonne and then in Biarritz[3†]. He was a member of the Academy of History of Cuba and the National Academy of Arts and Letters[3†].

Throughout his career, Bobadilla made significant contributions to literature and journalism. His work spanned a variety of genres, including poetry, literary criticism, storytelling, and travel writing[3†]. Despite his sometimes controversial nature, Bobadilla was highly cultured and had a very personal writing style[3†].

First Publication of His Main Works

Emilio Bobadilla was a prolific writer, with his works spanning various genres including novels, travel books, and chronicles. Here are some of his main works:

Bobadilla’s works were characterized by his aggressive temperament, biting and carefree style, but he was also very cultured and possessed a very personal, strong, and vigorous style[4†][3†].

Analysis and Evaluation

Emilio Bobadilla’s work was characterized by his aggressive temperament, biting and carefree style[1†]. Despite this, he was also very cultured and possessed a very personal, strong, and vigorous style[1†]. His criticisms often led to numerous and heated journalistic disputes, and he even challenged others to duels[1†].

His works spanned various genres including novels, travel books, and chronicles[1†]. His novel “A fuego lento”, published in Barcelona in 1903, is one of his most popular works[1†][5†][1†]. His erotic novel “En la noche dormida”, published in Madrid in 1913, is another notable work[1†].

Bobadilla’s work has had a significant impact on the literary world. His unique style and approach to writing have influenced many writers and critics. His contributions to literature, particularly in the realm of criticism, have been recognized and appreciated[1†].

Personal Life

Emilio Bobadilla’s personal life was as vibrant and varied as his professional career. Born in Cárdenas, Cuba, on 24 June 1862, he embarked on a long journey due to his father’s position as a councilman and university professor[2†]. This journey took him to various places, including Baltimore, Veracruz, Madrid, and Havana[2†].

Bobadilla’s personal life was marked by his travels. He lived for extended periods in Paris and Madrid, where he established himself in 1887[2†]. He also traveled through Holland, Italy, Belgium, Denmark, England, Colombia, Venezuela, Puerto Rico, Panama, and Nicaragua[2†].

In 1909, Bobadilla returned to Cuba for two years[2†]. He was later appointed consul of Cuba in Bayonne and then in Biarritz[2†]. He was a member of the Academy of History of Cuba and the National Academy of Arts and Letters[2†].

Bobadilla was known for his aggressive, biting, and carefree temperament[2†]. This was reflected not only in his writing but also in his personal life. He was involved in numerous and heated journalistic controversies and even challenged to duels, one of which was with another critic, the novelist Leopoldo Alas "Clarín"[2†]. The duel took place on 21 May 1892[2†].

Emilio Bobadilla passed away on 1 January 1921 in Biarritz, France[2†][1†][2†].

Conclusion and Legacy

Emilio Bobadilla, also known as “Fray Candil”, left a significant legacy in the world of literature. His work spanned various forms of writing, including poetry, literary criticism, journalism, and storytelling[1†]. His aggressive, biting, and carefree temperament was reflected in his writing, which was also very cultured and possessed a very personal, strong, and vigorous style[1†].

Bobadilla’s novel “A fuego lento”, first published in 1903, is considered a veritable roman à clef[1†][6†]. The novel depicts the extravagancies of a panorama drenched in all corrupting suns and dampness, with carnal desire constantly breathing around, and the characters’ skins oozing an impossible to disclose tropical barbarism[1†][6†]. This clear precedent to modern Latin American narrative showcases Bobadilla’s ability to depict in a tragicomic manner the realities of his time[1†][6†].

Bobadilla’s work continues to be studied and appreciated for its contribution to literature. His legacy is a testament to his unique style and the impact of his work on future generations of writers[1†].

Key Information

References and Citations:

  1. Wikipedia (English) - Emilio Bobadilla [website] - link
  2. Wikipedia (Spanish) - Emilio Bobadilla [website] - link
  3. Wikipedia (English) - Emilio Bobadilla Cáceres [website] - link
  4. Goodreads - Author: Books by Emilio Bobadilla (Author of A fuego lento) [website] - link
  5. Internet Archive - Baturrillo : Emilio Bobadilla [website] - link
  6. Google Books - A fuego lento - Emilio Bobadilla [website] - link
Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License 4.0; additional terms may apply.
Ondertexts® is a registered trademark of Ondertexts Foundation, a non-profit organization.