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Takashi Nagasaki

Takashi Nagasaki Takashi Nagasaki[4†]

Takashi Nagasaki (長崎尚志) also know as Keishi Edogawa (江戸川啓視), Garaku Toshusai (東周斎雅楽), Big O (ビッグ・オー) and Richard Woo (リチャード・ウー), born in 1956, is a notable Japanese author, manga writer, and former editor at Shogakukan. He led Big Comic Spirits and collaborated with Naoki Urasawa on acclaimed works like Pluto and Billy Bat, reshaping manga creation by becoming a co-creator alongside artists[1†].

Early Years and Education

Takashi Nagasaki was born on January 14, 1956[1†]. Unfortunately, there is limited information available about his early life and education. However, it is known that he began his professional journey at Shogakukan in 1980[1†]. During this time, he served as an editor on various manga magazines, including Big Comic Spirits, where he was editor-in-chief from July 1999 to 2001[1†]. This period likely played a significant role in shaping his career and honing his skills in the manga industry.

Career Development and Achievements

Takashi Nagasaki began his professional career at Shogakukan in 1980[1†]. He worked as an editor on various manga magazines, including Big Comic, Weekly Shōnen Sunday, Big Comic Original, and Big Comic Superior[1†]. In the mid-1980s, he was editor to Takao Saito on Golgo 13[1†]. Nagasaki is also one of the people credited for editing Rumiko Takahashi’s Ranma ½[1†].

In July 1999, he became editor-in-chief of Big Comic Spirits and held the position until leaving Shogakukan in 2001[1†]. Nagasaki first met Naoki Urasawa when he was assigned to be the editor of the newly debuting manga artist[1†]. The two collaborate so frequently, that Nagasaki has been called Urasawa’s "producer"[1†].

Nagasaki was a co-author of Urasawa and Hokusei Katsushika’s adventure series Master Keaton (1988–1994)[1†]. It was later adapted into a television anime and original video animation series between 1998 and 2000[1†]. From 1994 to 2001, Nagasaki collaborated with Urasawa on the story for the thriller Monster[1†]. They co-wrote a companion novel titled Another Monster in 2002[1†], and the manga was adapted into an anime in 2004[1†]. The duo also collaborated from 1999 to 2007 on the story for the science fiction mystery 20th Century Boys and its sequel 21st Century Boys[1†].

Since becoming freelance, Nagasaki has worked as an author under various pen names, such as Keishi Edogawa, Garaku Toshusai, Big O, and Richard Woo[1†]. He is best known for his collaborations with Naoki Urasawa, such as Pluto (2003–2009) and Billy Bat (2008–2016)[1†].

Nagasaki has received several awards for his work, including the Tezuka Osamu Cultural Prize (2005), Seiun Award (2008, 2010), Max & Moritz Prize (2014), and Saito Takao Award (2018)[1†].

First Publication of His Main Works

Takashi Nagasaki has been a significant figure in the manga industry, with a career spanning several decades. He has worked on numerous projects, often in collaboration with other notable figures in the field[1†].

These works represent just a fraction of Nagasaki’s extensive portfolio. His contributions to the manga industry have been significant, and his works continue to be enjoyed by readers worldwide[1†].

Analysis and Evaluation

Takashi Nagasaki’s work in the manga industry has been transformative. His collaborations with Naoki Urasawa, such as Pluto and Billy Bat, have been particularly impactful[1†]. The Kobe Shimbun noted that Nagasaki introduced the concept of a producer into the manga industry, establishing a new relationship with manga artists[1†]. Brian Ruh of Anime News Network described Nagasaki as the only editor who "has risen to the level of co-creator alongside the artist"[1†].

Nagasaki’s approach to manga differs from that of novel writing. He noted that while novels are evaluated and rewarded based on one finished book, manga is rewarded for being interesting in the middle of its story[1†]. This perspective has likely influenced the pacing and development of his works, contributing to their unique appeal.

Nagasaki’s influence extends beyond his own works. His role as an editor at Shogakukan allowed him to shape the direction of various manga magazines[1†]. His tenure as editor-in-chief of Big Comic Spirits from July 1999 to 2001 was particularly notable[1†].

In conclusion, Takashi Nagasaki’s contributions to the manga industry have been significant. His innovative approach to storytelling and his ability to collaborate effectively with artists have resulted in a body of work that is both critically acclaimed and widely enjoyed[1†].

Personal Life

Takashi Nagasaki has always maintained a low profile when it comes to his personal life. However, it is known that due to his father’s job, Nagasaki lived in Hiroshima from first to fourth grade[1†]. His personal life has been largely influenced by his professional journey, which began at Shogakukan in 1980[1†]. He has worked under various pen names, such as Keishi Edogawa (江戸川啓視), Garaku Toshusai (東周斎雅楽), Big O (ビッグ・オー) and Richard Woo (リチャード・ウー)[1†].

Despite his significant contributions to the manga industry, Nagasaki rarely socializes outside of work[1†]. His collaborations with Naoki Urasawa are so frequent that Nagasaki has been called Urasawa’s “producer.” However, Nagasaki said he does not call himself a producer and described his “workload” as being the same as a manga editor’s[1†].

Unfortunately, there is no publicly available information about Nagasaki’s family or relationships. As a public figure, he has chosen to keep these aspects of his life private. This is a common practice among many individuals in the public eye to maintain their privacy.

Conclusion and Legacy

Takashi Nagasaki’s legacy in the manga industry is profound and enduring. His collaborations with Naoki Urasawa, such as Pluto (2003–2009) and Billy Bat (2008–2016), have left an indelible mark on the field[1†]. The Kobe Shimbun wrote that Nagasaki brought the concept of a producer into the manga industry, and in doing so “established a new relationship with manga artists”[1†] 1[1†]. Brian Ruh of Anime News Network described Nagasaki as the only editor who “has risen to the level of co-creator alongside the artist”[1†] 1[1†].

Nagasaki’s philosophy towards manga creation is unique. He noted how writing manga is different from writing novels, stating that the latter are evaluated and rewarded based on one finished book, but manga is rewarded for being interesting in the middle of its story[1†]. This perspective has shaped his approach to manga creation and editing, contributing to the success of his collaborations.

His career, which began at Shogakukan in 1980 and has spanned over four decades, has seen him work on various manga magazines, including as editor-in-chief of Big Comic Spirits from July 1999 to 2001[1†]. Since becoming freelance, Nagasaki has continued to influence the manga industry through his work as an author under various pen names[1†].

Despite his significant contributions, Nagasaki remains a humble figure. He does not call himself a producer and described his “workload” as being the same as a manga editor’s[1†]. His dedication to his craft and his ability to adapt to the evolving landscape of the manga industry attest to his enduring influence.

In conclusion, Takashi Nagasaki’s legacy in the manga industry is characterized by his innovative approach to manga creation and editing, his successful collaborations, and his enduring influence. His work continues to inspire and shape the field of manga, making him a pivotal figure in the industry[1†].

Key Information

References and Citations:

  1. Wikipedia (English) - Takashi Nagasaki [website] - link
  2. Wikipedia (English) - Pluto (manga) [website] - link
  3. Wikipedia (English) - Naoki Urasawa [website] - link
  4. Anime-Planet - Takashi NAGASAKI [website] link
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