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Wallace Delois Wattles

Wallace Delois Wattles Wallace Delois Wattles[1†]

Wallace Delois Wattles was an American author, best known for his work in the New Thought and self-help movements[1†][2†]. Born in 1860[1†][2†], Wattles spent much of his life studying and writing about spirituality and personal development[1†]. Despite his personal life remaining somewhat obscure[1†][2†], his writings have been widely quoted and continue to remain in print[1†][2†].

Wattles’ most notable work is a 1910 book called “The Science of Getting Rich”, in which he explained how to become wealthy[1†][2†][3†]. This groundbreaking book has inspired countless individuals to achieve financial success and personal fulfillment.

Early Years and Education

Wallace Delois Wattles was born in the United States in 1860[1†][2†][3†]. He received little formal education[1†][2†][3†]. According to the 1880 US Federal Census, Wallace lived with his parents on a farm in Nunda Township, McHenry County, Illinois, and worked as a farm laborer[1†][2†][3†]. His early life was marked by financial struggle, which perhaps influenced his later work on the principles of wealth and success[1†][2†][3†].

Career Development and Achievements

Wallace D. Wattles began his career as a writer, focusing on the New Thought and self-help movements[1†][2†][4†]. Despite facing financial struggles and receiving little formal education, Wattles dedicated himself to studying and writing about spirituality and personal development[1†][2†][4†].

His most notable work, “The Science of Getting Rich”, was published in 1910[1†][2†][4†]. In this book, Wattles explained how to become wealthy, and it has since been widely quoted and remains in print[1†][2†][4†]. His writings have had a significant impact on the New Thought and self-help movements[1†][2†][4†].

In addition to his writing, Wattles also ran for public office. In the 1908 election, he ran as a Socialist Party of America candidate in the Eighth Congressional District[1†][2†]. In 1910, he again ran as a Socialist candidate, this time for the office of Prosecuting Attorney for the Madison County, Indiana 50th court district[1†][2†].

Wattles’ career was marked by his dedication to helping others understand the principles of wealth and success. Despite his early struggles, he was able to achieve significant success and leave a lasting legacy through his writings[1†][2†][4†].

First Publication of His Main Works

Wallace D. Wattles is best known for his book “The Science of Getting Rich,” which was first published in 1910[5†][6†]. This work is considered a classic in the New Thought and self-help movements, and it provides a detailed guide on how to achieve wealth[5†][1†][5†][6†].

In addition to “The Science of Getting Rich,” Wattles wrote several other influential books:

Wattles’ works have had a significant impact on the fields of personal development and self-help literature[5†][1†][5†][6†]. His writings continue to inspire countless individuals to pursue financial success and personal fulfillment[5†][1†][5†][6†].

Analysis and Evaluation

Wallace D. Wattles, an American author and a pioneer in the New Thought literary movement, has left a significant impact on the fields of personal development and self-help literature[1†][2†][7†][8†][4†].

His best-known work, “The Science of Getting Rich,” published in 1910, is considered a classic in the New Thought and self-help movements[1†][2†][7†][8†][4†]. In this book, Wattles provides a detailed guide on how to achieve wealth, a topic that has inspired countless individuals to pursue financial success and personal fulfillment[1†][2†][7†][8†][4†].

Wattles’ writings are characterized by their practicality and directness[1†][2†][7†][8†][4†]. He believed in the power of positive thinking and the potential for personal transformation[1†][2†][7†][8†][4†]. His works, including “The Science of Being Great” and “The Science of Being Well,” provide practical guides to achieving personal power, greatness, and physical well-being[1†][2†][7†][8†][4†].

Despite his somewhat obscure personal life[1†][2†], Wattles’ influence extends beyond his lifetime. His ideas continue to impact the fields of personal development and self-help literature[1†][2†][7†][8†][4†]. His legacy serves as a testament to the power of positive thinking and the potential for personal transformation[1†][2†][7†][8†][4†].

Personal Life

Wallace Wattles was married to Abbie Wattles (née Bryant), and they had three children: Florence Wattles, Russell H. Wattles, and Agnes Wattles[1†][2†]. At the time of the 1910 census, Wallace’s mother, Mary A. Wattles, was living with the family at the age of 79[1†][2†].

Despite his professional success, Wattles’ personal life was marked by financial struggles[1†][9†]. He was always scheming and planning to provide for his family those things which make the abundant life possible[1†][9†]. His daughter, Florence, wrote that “he made lots of money, and had good health, except for his extreme frailty” in the last three years before his death[1†][2†].

Wattles died on February 7, 1911, in Ruskin, Tennessee, and his body was transported home for burial to Elwood, Indiana[1†][2†]. His death at age 51 was regarded as “untimely” by his daughter[1†][2†]. As a sign of respect, businesses closed throughout the town for two hours on the afternoon of his funeral[2†].

Conclusion and Legacy

Wallace D. Wattles, despite his relatively short life and somewhat obscure personal history, left a profound impact on the world of self-improvement and New Thought literature[1†][2†]. His work laid the foundation for later works in the self-help genre, and his principles continue to be embraced by those seeking personal and financial transformation[1†].

His most notable work, “The Science of Getting Rich,” published in 1910, remains widely quoted and in print, testifying to its timeless relevance[1†][2†][10†]. This book not only centers on the art of self-improvement but also has passed as one of the best books of all time[1†][10†].

Wattles’ legacy lives on through his writings, which continue to inspire countless individuals worldwide to attain not only monetary wealth but also personal fulfillment[1†][10†]. His death at age 51 was regarded as “untimely” by his daughter[1†][2†], but his influence continues to resonate more than a century after his passing[10†].

Key Information

References and Citations:

  1. Wikipedia (English) - Wallace Wattles [website] - link
  2. Wallace D. Wattles - About - Wallace D. Wattles [website] - link
  3. Wallace D. Wattles - The Man Behind The Secret - Wallace D. Wattles [website] - link
  4. Goodreads - Author: Wallace D. Wattles (Author of The Science of Getting Rich) [website] - link
  5. Goodreads - Author: Books by Wallace D. Wattles (Author of The Science of Getting Rich) [website] - link
  6. Goodreads - Book: The Science of Getting Rich [website] - link
  7. Goodreads - Book: The Science of Success [website] - link
  8. Goodreads - Book: Wallace Wattles: All 9 Books [website] - link
  9. WALLACE D. WATTLES - Wallace D. Wattles [website] - link
  10. ImaginationAndFaith - Wallace D. Wattles – Biography [website] - link
  11. Google Books - Wallace D. Wattles Fundamentals Collection: Mind: What Is It? + What Is Truth? - Wallace D Wattles [website] - link
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